Heartland Dance Article

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To give a picture of Aboriginal peoples' understanding and integrated life with their land I'd like to give an example of what is still common today. Recently in Arnhem Land a group on walkabout had noticed in an area that had long grass and was rich in food for animals that there was an absence of kangaroos. It was an area that should have supported kangaroos; it clearly stood out, and was brought to the attention of the tribal elders, who were aware that they hadn't been down to that area to sing the kangaroos in for a long while. A corroboree was then held at a given spot in that area, and the kangaroos were sung into that area once again. The didgeridoo singing and clapping formed the basis for a ritual to consciously act as guardians and caretakers of the land, observing and caring for the subtle balances of nature. As I understand it was an area not frequented often. Some months, later a healthy number of kangaroos had returned to form part of that local bioregion once again.

Slowly I'm trying to tie in with what has gone before, where we're at today, to help picture the powerful role that I see the didgeridoo as playing, and give us a glimpse of its unfolding role. Before I delve into the didgeridoo with what I see I'd like to complete what I started in discussing the magnetic currents - the songlines of the planet.

The flow from south to north can be likened to going from potential to actualising. The serpent of the north receiving and inspiring, and the serpent of the south giving and manifesting. Where these forces come together they drive the seed through its cycle of flourishing life, decline, death and rebirth. The land masses have moved over time, from being more in the Southern Hemisphere centred around an ancient landmass called Mu, or Gondwanaland - the Great Motherland - (home to the Lemurian civilisation) to being largely centred in the Northern Hemisphere today. Movement north through time is characterised by clarity, then individualisation separation and isolation, and a shift in focus towards the external world: thus fitting in with the past cycle and the current outcome of our northern hemisphere-based civilisation, where the northern-male orientated energy governs or affects the whole.

The last reversal of magnetic energy, or flipping of the earth's axis, appears to have occurred nearly a million years ago, along with a vast extinction or purification of life. This brought the spiralling, serpentine, positive magnetic field to the South Pole. Nourished by the life enhancing South Polar magnetic energies, humanity was again seeded. This coincides again with channelled material saying that the Lemurian Mother Empire was founded around 900,000 BC. The earth's magnetism was at its highest, and this was truly the Golden Era, the Garden of Eden. Australia, as part of that ancient land mass, was part of its centre and is the last remaining link to the past golden era. The Aboriginal culture has remained intact through the duration of the cycle as the generating seed.

The magnetism of the earth has, over time, through natural cycles, declined. Even 10,000-15,000 years ago, the earth's stronger magnetic field supported larger forms of plants, animals, and a more abundant variety of species. Aboriginal legends refer to a time prior to the disappearance of the large marsupials, when humans possessed greater psychic and visionary powers.

We are at a time now where the earth's magnetism is reaching its lowest level. So, like the cycle from seed to tree to fruit to seed again, we are seeing the fruit of this cycle rotting on the ground as civilisation literally decays about us. At the same time the seed is visible, seen in the remnants of indigenous cultures who hold visions and memories of the past golden era and show us parts of the puzzle of how to live as a guardian caretaker of the earth mother. It is not for us to blindly follow any particular culture, indigenous path, or spiritual way, but to be open to their gifts for many of the paths or openings to the coming age are around us in our homeland. Sometimes it can be easy to look to another culture in another land, to memories or writings of past civilisations, or to the stars or beyond, yet overlook or under-appreciate what is in our own backyard.

The Aboriginal people are clearly the case, and the didgeridoo is certainly symbolic.
It 's time to look and listen. The cycles of time as we know them have seen there being times on the planet when the mother principle has been more focal and times when the father principle is more focal, as recently; both bringing gifts and challenges. And so the energy and the land masses have moved in different directions across the face of the earth, from North to South, to South to North. It appears since time immemorial and beyond time, there has been a desire for exploration and expression of opposites for a higher, grander realisation to be grounded in reality. It shows in the large cycles and in the small picture interplay of a woman and a man in a relationship.
If we return to the rainbow serpent and the didgeridoo we may glimpse where we are moving.

In an ancient myth from Arnhem Land, "The great ancestral Rainbow Serpent Ngaljod first created into Ubar, a long hollow log. Ubar (as the didgeridoo spirit is called in this version) produces a powerful, hypnotic vibration and sound. The hollow inside of Ubar symbolises the uterus of the great mother, and the external form symbolises the penis or the male form of the rainbow serpent. So the earth has created a musical instrument that holds the female and male energies in perfect harmony: a totally organic instrument."

Even the Aboriginal people have been affected somewhat by the predominant male energy of this past cycle and the declining earth magnetism, which have led to the didgeridoo being said to be only for males to play. Even though this has been the widely held view, there are apparently tribes in Western Australia where women have and do play, and others in the Northern Territory that played in certain women's rituals*. I have heard it said that once it was a woman's instrument. Interestingly, back to opposites once again!

 


NOTE-

* In the National Indiginous Newspaper "Koori Mail",
an Aboriginal woman was featured as having been given approval by her elders to play and perform with Didgeridoo publically.

1999 Tynon Bradford-Alaom

 

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